The most valuable thing

It was slightly more than 20 years ago. A delightful summer afternoon, ironically this memory includes me mowing the lawn. Ironic because I because I mow lawns for a living in the summer. My friend John is walking by. I stop what I’m doing to visit. He tells me about a new type of treatment program that is solely based on the spiritual principles found in the Big Book Alcoholics Anonymous.  At this point, having a little more than 2 years of continuous sobriety/clean time. I thought, boy I sure wish I could go there.

Well little did I know at that time, what the mighty Jester of the Cosmos had written in the book of my life. On November 16th, 1998 I entered the program at The Retreat.

The first thing that hit me was, during a Big Book study with Roger B. He says. “I hope you’re DONE and not just here to take a break.” Woah, just woah. Yes, I’m so done. The next thing was again Roger B. “Are you willing to believe in the possibility?” That a Higher Power could restore me to sanity. Yes! That would be the beginning of an intention to improve my conscious contact with God “as I understand God” which is impossible to comprehend. The basis of which is how I am willing to carry on without chemicals.

Fast forward to today. I have discovered the enlightened self-interest of, and the key to staying sober is helping others to recover. Wait, how can I help? What do I have to offer? Well as it turns out I have my experience. Which through sharing that, I am able to stay in recovery from addiction. I have found something else even more valuable than my experience. It is worth more than any material or financial commodity. It costs nothing but requires an immense amount of energy if offered with intention.

The most valuable thing is My Attention

Giving freely of my attention is the most generous thing I can do. With attention I discover understanding and that is what I get in return.

20 thoughts on “The most valuable thing

  1. A huge congrats to you!! Way not easy to overcome addictions! It takes a lot of discipline and repeated healthy behavior and much support. Living a sober life is the way to an Enlightened life. Bless you for your courage!! 💖

    Liked by 2 people

  2. Congratulations!

    I watched my father fight alcoholism. Instead of conquering his addiction, he managed it. Even though he wanted to, he could not get that nasty monkey off his back. I don’t believe he ever went for help. Why? Pride? Fear of what others might think? I don’t know. What I do know is we need each other. We have to take responsibility for our actions, but those actions include asking for and accepting help when we need it.

    My father was a good man, when he was sober. I just wish for his sake he had spent more of his life sober.

    Liked by 1 person

  3. Such a cool picture you paint here of the idyllic retreat and then how it impacts your life today. I like your realization. What can we pack into the stream of life? Rather than take out of it. I know that’s in the literature somewhere. Great post.

    Liked by 1 person

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